Abandoned Pup Becomes a High Flying Star on the Dock and at Home

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Flying is not something you usually associate with dogs, but a former APA Adoption Center rescue dog is changing that.

13494787_10207056851919422_2885648887790078003_n-1 A puppy was found abandoned in a rural area of Missouri. The Labrador mix named Serenity by her rescuers was transferred from the overcrowded rural St. Clair County Animal Control shelter to the APA Adoption Center .A044044

The former stray seemed to have springs in her legs and an eagerness to learn. APA matchmakers alerted a Purina trainer, Sara Brueske. Brueske is always looking for canine athletes in her work as an award winning trainer who frequently fosters dogs. Serenity became Kapow and began training with Brueske for a possible slot in a performing team at Purina Farms.

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Working with the award winning trainer, Kapow was a stand-out in several competitive canine events including Frisbee play and dock diving. But she didn’t have everything Brueske was looking for, so a search was on for a new home.

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Kapow’s wait for a new owner wasn’t long. An animal advocate added this high-flying pooch to his pack. An authority on flight as a professional avian ecologist, Ryan Brady knows a lot about active dogs.

Brady lives with a dock diving Yellow Labrador that is also an award winning sporting companion and a trained barn hunt dog. Rounding out the active Brady bunch is a sweet Puggle who embraces the hunting heritage of her Beagle ancestors and lap dog tendencies of her Pug lineage.Kapow_3_medal

”Kapow is a great dog! She fit right in with my other two dogs from the first day I adopted her and is a member of the family,” said Brady who is committed to new stimuli and training for his canine companions who often accompany him on nature hikes and farm visits.Kapow_1

Kapow won a ribbon on her first jump in a dock diving competition with Brady. He is continuing training on the Frisbee and dock-diving while adding new pursuits like retrieving and putting out bird decoys.Spending a lot of time in nature where her owner works at a wildlife refuge, Kapow succeeds at a pursuit where many other dogs fail.

”She catches and kills squirrels frequently,” explains Brady. “Her speed and agility are amazing.”

Kapow may not have wings, but it isn’t keeping her from flying on the ground or in the air.

photo by Ryan Brady

Kapow is one of 2,534 pets who found homes at the APA Adoption Center in 2015. Providing services to more than 10,000 animals annually, the APA provides a humane option for those surrendering unwanted or abandoned companion animals, provides education and outreach programs, reunites lost animals with their owners, provides pet adoption and foster care services and offers veterinary clinic services at a reduced rate. The APA Adoption center is open 7 days a week. For more information about the APA of Missouri, visit www.apamo.org or call 314-645-4610.

photo courtesy of Ryan Brady

A Yellow Ribbon on a Dog’s Leash Sends an Important Message

389711_574482065925784_1337248708_nHave you seen dogs with a yellow ribbon tied to their leash or a yellow leash with “nervous” embroidered on it? These are two ways dog owners are signaling the pet at the end of the leash needs extra room.

These are not necessarily dangerous animals. There are many reasons an owner may need extra space; the pet could be convalescing. The dog could be in training and needs extra space in order to concentrate on the new behaviors. The yellow ribbon or halter could signify a nervous and uncomfortable dog with strange people and animals.

Of course it’s always good to ask permission before petting someone’s dog—yellow ribbon or not. Doing so is just one way to help prevent some of the estimated 4.5 million dog bites that happen every year in the United States.

The Yellow Dog Project is using Facebook and other social media to spread the word that a dog sporting a yellow ribbon, harness or kerchief may not be safe to approach and should be left alone.

This video demonstrates how a yellow ribbon helps one dog recovering from terrible abuse:

A yellow ribbon on a dog leash sends an important message

A yellow ribbon on a dog leash sends an important message

A Day for Those Who Build America and Keep it Strong

There is “Talk Like a Pirate Day”, “Cheeseburger Day” and all sorts of observances that are a lot of fun and without a serious message.  But National Tradesmen Day is an annual national celebration to honor the men and women who work with their hands to build America and keep it running strong.

 It is an observance dear to my heart.  Both my father and his father were craftsmen.  Carpenters who worked out of a union hall at a time when there were not many tradespeople represented by unions in the Deep South.  They spent years in apprentice and training to perfect their skills for the wide variety jobs they completed.  I remember Sunday afternoon family drives after church, where my father would point with pride to a skyscraper or school he helped build.  It could be a bridge or a courthouse he had contributed to.  My father and grandfather knew how to build concrete forms or do intricate finishes.  Designers using exotic and expensive woods used in boardrooms or courtrooms knew my Dad could make the cuts and trim out their projects to their specifications. It was a point of pride for him to show off his work to his children.

I believe America’s tradespeople build our homes, roads, businesses, and schools. They keep our cars running, our lights on, our water flowing, and so much more. They are the backbone of our functioning nation IRWIN® Tools; a manufacturer of hand tools and power tool accessories has been honoring them for years with celebrations, recognition events and activities throughout the country

Friday, September 20, 2013 is National Tradesmen Day.  It also puts a spotlight on a problem in our nation—one caused by a shortage of people willing to work with their hands. Manpower’s recent talent shortage survey reports that for the fourth consecutive year, skilled trades are the most difficult jobs to fill in the United States. The American Society of Civil Engineers says America’s roads and bridges are in disrepair, assigning a D+ grade to America’s overall infrastructure. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate continues to hover at historically high levels while a critical need for skilled tradesmen exists. Some believe not only does our nation have a jobs problem; America has a skills shortage.

At one time, ironworkers and welders were glorified. Photographs of tradesmen eating an open-air lunch on a girder high atop a yet-to-be completed skyscraper take us back to a very different world—one where working with your hands was a dignified way to earn a living. Today, a four-year degree and a desk job are considered the keys to a desirable lifestyle. Most high schools eliminated shop class years ago, and now only six percent of high school seniors consider a career in the trades. The National Association of Manufacturing, The National Center for Career Education and Research and several other business organizations believe more schools should teach students some trades offer challenging careers where they can often out-earn their college educated peers. 

 “It’s time that we once again present the trades as a respectable career option for the next generation. Becoming a trained plumber, electrician, or welder offers a clear and stable career path where working with your hands allows you to contribute meaningfully to our society,” says Rich Mathews, Senior Vice President of Marketing for IRWIN Tools.

There are an estimated 600,000 open jobs in the skilled trades, simply because people don’t have the proper training to fill the positions.  Many business leaders say they believe our nation is not only facing a job shortage, but a skills shortage.

Today is a day to recognize the people who lace up boots each morning before heading to the jobsite. Many of them have spent as much or more time learning their craft than workers who grab a tie and head to a high-rise office.  Recognize the contributions the trades make in your life. If you go onto a job site, or anywhere you see a skilled laborer working such as a drywall or electrician, carpenter and simply shake his or her hand and say “thanks for the work that you do.”

To learn more the annual observance head to http://www.irwin.com/nationaltradesmenday or find them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/nationaltradesmenday

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Fall Deadlines Near for Some Federal Stimulus Programs for Small Business

There is still time for entrepreneurs and small businesses to get their share of the federal economic stimulus money.  The government’s stimulus measures allow firms that incurred net operating losses in 2008 to carry them back five years instead of the standard two years.  This allows businesses to apply those losses against taxes paid in the past and obtain refunds. Companies that got extensions of the filing deadlines can still take advantage of this tax break.  You can find interviews and updates on this tax provision of the stimulus at http://www.sbtv.com/IRS. Eligible calendar year corporations have until September 15, 2009 and eligible individuals have until October 15, 2009 to choose the expanded carry-back option.

Another stimulus benefit for small business is an expanded Section 179 deduction, which allows small enterprises to deduct up-front rather than depreciate the cost of equipment such as computers, furniture, manufacturing machines and vehicles, up to $250,000.  You will find much more detailed information at http://www.irs.gov/businesses/index.html

Another part of the federal stimulus effort is an online training course to increase small business participation in federal contracting.  The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering the free instruction after small business contracting fell short again.  The free course, “Recovery Act Opportunities: How to Win Federal Contracts,” is available at www.sba.gov/fedcontractingtraining.

Looking for small business news and tips?  Please consider following me on Twitter to learn more about small business issues and events to give you a competitive edge.  Just go to http://twitter.com/danitablackwood and click the “follow” button.